• Search
March 22, 2019 |

Saving water bodies

On World Water Day, which is observed on March 22, we must rethink on the actual efforts made to save the dying water bodies in Kashmir valley. Some of the famous water bodies in Kashmir, including the lakes like Wullar, Dal, Hokersar, Anchar lake, etc have either been shrinking with unabated encroachments or have been polluted to the extent that their survival in the next couple of decades seems impossible. The efforts to conserve the wetlands and water bodies here have been too diminished in their scope to bring any result. Most of the times, it is the intervention of the courts that have come to the rescue of the water bodies than the government.  Two major water bodies in Kashmir, Dal and Wular, are continuously being polluted due to the flow untreated sewage into them. The administration has repeatedly failed to prevent their use as dumping sites. Barring the rare cleaning exercises, in which even authorities in the past said they had taken help from army, there is no respite in controlling the pollution. The courts have also found and held responsible several departments for exacerbating the problem. Besides the lakes, river Jhelum also has become a source to empty the sewage (liquid waste) as numerous small drains have been constructed along its course. It is generally said that waters of lakes and the river used to be so pure and pollution free that people used to drink it without treating it. Today, leave alone the human consumption, the once pristine water bodies have become so murky that it is difficult to tell them apart from the sewers. Even in Srinagar city, where the inland waterways provided means of transportation, there is no sign of them today. It is right time that the government adheres to its own policies and rules as laid down in conservation programmes. Not only human population, but the fauna also has been affected by the rising pollution in water bodies. There were reports published suggesting death of fish due to increased level of pollution and toxicity in some water bodies. With the fish gone, thousands of migratory birds that visit the valley and feed on fish will not find the habitat suitable. We are past the debates, even the court directions. Now is the time to act and save our water world. The water bodies are indispensable as they provide livelihood to thousands of people, whether it is in the form of tourists that they attract or the produce that is extracted from them.      

 

Archive
March 22, 2019 |

Saving water bodies

              

On World Water Day, which is observed on March 22, we must rethink on the actual efforts made to save the dying water bodies in Kashmir valley. Some of the famous water bodies in Kashmir, including the lakes like Wullar, Dal, Hokersar, Anchar lake, etc have either been shrinking with unabated encroachments or have been polluted to the extent that their survival in the next couple of decades seems impossible. The efforts to conserve the wetlands and water bodies here have been too diminished in their scope to bring any result. Most of the times, it is the intervention of the courts that have come to the rescue of the water bodies than the government.  Two major water bodies in Kashmir, Dal and Wular, are continuously being polluted due to the flow untreated sewage into them. The administration has repeatedly failed to prevent their use as dumping sites. Barring the rare cleaning exercises, in which even authorities in the past said they had taken help from army, there is no respite in controlling the pollution. The courts have also found and held responsible several departments for exacerbating the problem. Besides the lakes, river Jhelum also has become a source to empty the sewage (liquid waste) as numerous small drains have been constructed along its course. It is generally said that waters of lakes and the river used to be so pure and pollution free that people used to drink it without treating it. Today, leave alone the human consumption, the once pristine water bodies have become so murky that it is difficult to tell them apart from the sewers. Even in Srinagar city, where the inland waterways provided means of transportation, there is no sign of them today. It is right time that the government adheres to its own policies and rules as laid down in conservation programmes. Not only human population, but the fauna also has been affected by the rising pollution in water bodies. There were reports published suggesting death of fish due to increased level of pollution and toxicity in some water bodies. With the fish gone, thousands of migratory birds that visit the valley and feed on fish will not find the habitat suitable. We are past the debates, even the court directions. Now is the time to act and save our water world. The water bodies are indispensable as they provide livelihood to thousands of people, whether it is in the form of tourists that they attract or the produce that is extracted from them.      

 

News From Rising Kashmir

;